Market Update: May 15, 2017

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  • Overnight in Asia most indexes were up fractionally while Japan pulled back slightly. G-7 discussions focused on protectionist threats, which weighed on sentiment. North Korea also fired a new missile over the weekend, adding to tensions on the peninsula.
  • WTI crude oil prices are up ~3.0%, to $49.25/barrel, after energy ministers from Saudi Arabia and Russia agreed that extension to oil production cuts for an additional nine months, through March 2018, is needed.
  • European markets were mixed on either side of flat. Investors were positive on Christian Democrats state victory supporting Merkel’s hold on power, while oil move was also welcomed.
  • U.S. markets are moving higher, boosted by news on potential oil production cuts. Meanwhile, concerns over cyberattacks and Trump/Comey drama may dampen enthusiasm as trading progresses.

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Key Insights

  • The economy remains on track for Q2 gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 2.0% to 2.5% despite mixed inflation readings and retail sales below forecast.
  • The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose +0.2% month over month and up from the drop of -0.3% in March, however both year over year CPI (+2.2%) and year over year core CPI (+1.9%) were below expectations, triggering the rally in safe havens last Friday.
  • Retail sales (+0.4%) were also below expectations, but up from the prior month. When considering the improvement in consumer sentiment, it is important to remember that this data point (retail sales) and the performance of retail stocks, should not be viewed as an indictment of the U.S. consumer. Rather than a changing consumer, it is a change in consumer buying habits, which is combining to alter not only retail sales figures, but also pricing measures. Consumers are spending: 1) more online, 2) on experiences over goods, and 3) comparison shopping using mobile technology. Consequently, it is very difficult for the department store model to continue charging premium, retail prices.
  • Considering the unemployment rate of 4.4%, wage growth of +2.5% year over year, riding confidence and delayed tax refunds, the near-term (Q2) and longer-term (2017) GDP trajectory appears favorable. Clarity on tax reform could take these numbers even higher.

Macro Notes

  • Excellent earnings season but bar will soon be raised. First quarter earnings season has been excellent by almost any measure. Results beat expectations by more than usual, the overall growth rate is very strong, and guidance has provided above-average support for analysts’ estimates for the balance of 2017. But at the risk of raining on the earnings parade, we would note that comparisons will get tougher as we anniversary the earnings recession trough of 2016, while the risk that the corporate tax reform timetable gets pushed into 2018 has increased. Market participants generally expect fiscal policy to begin to provide an earnings boost by year end, an expectation that has become increasingly tenuous.

 

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  • Chinese industrial production growth weaker than expected. Chinese industrial production growth came in at 6.5% vs. expectations of 7% and down from period month of 7.6%. On an absolute basis, the economy is still on track to meet its growth goals, though it looks like growth may have peaked for the year at the end of the first quarter. The government continues to crack down on excess leverage in the financial system; today’s numbers are unlikely to move them off that path.
  • Japan domestic demand, and prices, rise in April. We normally think of Japan as an export oriented economy, but domestic demand increased over 4% on a year-over-year basis, with the impact felt most strongly in demand for raw materials. Producer prices rose modestly last month against declining expectations and are running at 2.1% annually.
  • Bank of Japan. Just like the Federal Reserve (Fed) and the European Central Bank (ECB), the Bank of Japan (BOJ) is under some public pressure to outline how it intends to unwind both its zero-interest rate policy and the massive expansion of its balance sheet to 93% of the country’s GDP. Recent statements from BOJ Governor Kuroda suggests such policy announcements may be coming. The more good news that comes out of the Japanese economy, the more pressure the BOJ is under.
  • Win streak snapped, but lack of volatility remains. The S&P 500 snapped its 3-week win streak last week, with a modest 0.3% drop. One thing continued though and that was the incredibly small daily ranges and lack of overall volatility. On the week, the S&P 500 traded in less than a one-percent range (from high to low) for the second consecutive week ( only the third time since 1995). Additionally, the intraday range on Friday was 0.22% – the smallest daily range on a full day of trading in nearly three years.
  • Checking in on small caps. The lack of volatility isn’t just in the blue chips, as the Russell 2000 has traded in a range of only 6.8% over the past 20 weeks. That is the tightest 20-week range since at least 1990. After a big jump in the fourth-quarter, small caps have lagged large caps this year, as they continue to consolidate the late 2016 gains.

MonitoringWeek_header

Tuesday

  • Italy: GDP (Q1)
  • UK: CPI & PPI (Apr)
  • Eurozone: GDP (Q1)

Wednesday

  • Russia: GDP (Q1)
  • Japan: GDP (Q1)

Thursday

  • LEI (Apr)
  • ECB: Draghi

 

 

 

 

 

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: November 21, 2016

© Provided by CNBC

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  • Stocks higher to begin holiday-shortened week. Equity markets are modestly positive this morning after gaining for the second week in a row; though the S&P 500, Dow, and Nasdaq each fell 0.2% on Friday. The healthcare sector (-1.1%) underperformed, led lower by biotech, while no other sector moved by more than 0.5%. Overseas, both the Nikkei and the Shanghai Composite advanced 0.8% overnight, while European markets are ticking higher in afternoon trading. Elsewhere, last week’s strength in crude oil ($47.65/barrel) has carried over as the commodity is up another 2.8% ahead of next week’s official OPEC meeting in Vienna, COMEX gold ($1214/oz.) is up 0.4%, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury is a couple of basis points lower after finishing the week at 2.34%, its highest close in over a year.

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  • Final earnings push to the finish line. With just a couple dozen S&P 500 companies left to report Q3 2016 results, Thomson-tracked earnings for the index are tracking to a 4.2% year-over-year gain, representing a 5% upside surprise. Excluding the energy sector’s earnings declines, earnings on pace for a solid 7.5% year-over-year gain. As impressive as the Q3 upside has been, the minimal 0.8% drop in estimates since October 1 for the next four quarters, including a small increase over the past week, has been particularly noteworthy and we think bodes well for the next two or three quarters.

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  • Another weekly gain for the S&P 500. The S&P 500 gained 0.8% for the week last week, but what is more worthwhile is it did this after gaining more than 3% the week before. Incredibly, this is now 10 consecutive times that the week after a 3% gain was green. Leading the way again were small caps and mid caps, as both the Russell 2000 and S&P 400 Midcap indexes closed at new all-time highs on Friday. The Russell 2000 is now up 11 consecutive days for the longest winning streak since 12 in a row back in 2003.
  • Holiday shopping preview. Although the market’s attention has been squarely on the election for the past several weeks, we should not forget how important this time of year is for the U.S. economy. Consumers are in good shape, with low financial obligations, steady job and wage gains, and high consumer sentiment measures. This, along with retailers’ back-to-school shopping increases and the solid stock market performance in 2016, suggest the National Retail Federation’s 3.6% forecast for year-over-year holiday sales growth may be doable. We do not necessarily expect these sales gains to translate into outperformance for the consumer sectors, but we do not expect them to spook markets.
  • Housing, manufacturing, and the consumer in focus this week as investors await the OPEC meeting. While a high-level OPEC meeting is set for Monday and Tuesday this week, the official OPEC meeting in Vienna isn’t until November 30. Until then, investors will digest Black Friday sales figures, which have become much less important in recent years, along with data on home sales, durable goods orders, and the Markit Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) for manufacturing. The Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) will release the minutes of its November 1-2, 2016 meeting this week as well. Other than the key German IFO data for November, it’s a fairly quiet week for international events and data, aside from a speech by European Central Bank (ECB)President Mario Draghi early in the week.
  • Welcome to Thanksgiving week. Historically the week of Thanksgiving has had a slight bullish bias, as do most trading days around major holidays. Over the past 20 years, the average return during the week of Thanksgiving for the S&P 500 has been 0.8%, positive 65% of the time (13 out of 20). Looking at the day-by-day performance, Monday has the best average return, up 0.5%, although Wednesday has been higher more often, 70% of the time. Surprisingly, the best Thanksgiving week over that timespan was 2008, when all four days were green and the S&P gained 12.0%. The worst? All four days in 2011 were red and the index fell 4.7%.

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Monday

  • OPEC Meeting in Vienna
  • ECB’s Draghi Speaks in Strasbourg

Tuesday

  • OPEC Meeting in Vienna

Wednesday

  • Durable Goods Orders and Shipments (Oct)
  • Markit Mfg. PMI (Nov)
  • FOMC Minutes
  • Eurozone: Markit Mfg. PMI (Nov)
  • Japan: Nikkei Mfg. PMI (Nov)

Thursday

  • Germany: Ifo

Friday

  • Advance Report on Goods Trade Balance (Oct)

 

 

 

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: November 14, 2016

© Provided by CNBC

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  • Stocks near flat as bond yields continue to rise. U.S. markets are little changed in early trading, though the bond market continues to make waves as the yield on the 10-year Note (2.25%) is up another 10 basis points from Friday’s close. Last week saw the S&P 500 post its largest weekly gain in more than two years (+3.8%) with the heavily-weighted financial sector leading the way, up 11.4%; rate-sensitive utilities, consumer staples, telecom, and real estate all closed lower on the week. Asian markets were mixed overnight; Japan’s Nikkei (+1.7%) climbed following a better than expected Q3 gross domestic product (GDP) release, while the Hang Seng lost 1.4%. European markets are mostly higher in the afternoon session, though they have pulled back from earlier levels alongside a drop in oil, which is down 1.2% to $42.90/barrel as supply concerns weigh on the price. Finally, COMEX gold ($1211/oz.) continues to sell off and the dollar index (+1.0%) has carried over last week’s momentum, approaching two-year highs.

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  • Earnings recession ending with a bang. Corporate America is delivering a strong end to earnings recession, with the S&P 500 tracking to a 4.1% year-over-year earnings increase (approximately 7.4% excluding the energy sector). The 71% beat rate has led to a roughly 5% upside surprise to prior (October 1, 2016) estimates. S&P 500 earnings estimates for the next four quarters, which dipped just 0.1% over the past week, have continued to hold up well during earnings season, losing slightly more than 1%. Look for more from us on earnings in the upcoming weeks in our Corporate Beige Book and Outlook 2017.

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  • What a week. Last week was historic on many levels. Among the highlights: the S&P 500 gained 3.8% for its best week since October 2014, the Dow gained 5.4% for its best week since December 2011, bonds were hit very hard as the 10-year yield spiked 21% (the most ever, using reliable data going back 50 years), the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) had its third-largest weekly drop ever (down 37%), biotech had its best week in seven years, small caps gained more than 10%, microcaps did even better by adding 12%, and financials tacked on 11% – their best week since May 2009. We are not surprised that stocks recovered from the initial post-election selloff; but rather how swiftly. There were several factors behind the sharp turnaround, including the certainty of the outcome, optimism regarding a peaceful transition, anticipation of market-friendly policies, and negative investor sentiment heading into the election.
  • Post-election standouts include financials, healthcare and industrials. The outlooks for financials, healthcare, and industrials appear to have brightened meaningfully and energy and small caps may get a boost. The near-term may continue to be volatile for emerging markets, though we maintain our positive intermediate-to-long-term view on that asset class amid attractive valuations, earnings stabilization, and expected moderation of Trump’s views on foreign trade. Look for more on potential election impacts in our Outlook 2017, due out later this month.
  • Japanese GDP upside surprise. Japanese Q3 economic growth was much higher than expected, increasing 2.2% on an annualized basis, compared to expectations of a 0.8% increase. Trade was the surprising variable, with exports higher and imports lower than expected. While this is good news for the economy overall, data from key sectors like business and consumer spending were largely consistent with expectations. That data, combined with measures of inflation also released, suggest that internal Japanese demand remains relatively weak, despite the better GDP headline.
  • Chinese economic data was slightly weaker than expected, and flat over previous releases. China released industrial production and retail sales overnight. Industrial production grew at 6.1% year over year, slightly less than the 6.2% increase expected. Consumer spending increased 10% year over year, a good gain on an absolute basis, but still below the 10.7% expected. Overall, the data from China continue to show stabilization in the economy, but there is much work to do as the government attempts to guide the economy from an industrial and export orientation toward a more consumer-oriented consumer economy.
  • Key data on inflation, housing, manufacturing, and the consumer along with Fed Chair Yellen in the week ahead. Late last week, Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) Chair Janet Yellen added a last minute appearance before the Joint Economic Committee of Congress for November 17, and that appearance is the key to this week’s calendar. Data on inflation, housing, manufacturing, and consumer spending will also draw plenty of attention. In addition to Yellen, there are more than a dozen other Fed speakers on the docket this week, presumably preparing markets for a December rate hike. Overseas, key data on GDP (Japan) and industrial production and retail sales (China) were released over the weekend, while later in the week a key speech from European Central Bank (ECB) President Draghi and data on GDP (Eurozone), ZEW (Germany) and CPI (UK) are on tap.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • Kaplan (Hawk)
  • Lacker (Hawk)

Tuesday

  • Retail Sales (Oct)
  • Empire State Manufacturing Report (Nov)
  • Fischer (Hawk)
  • Germany: ZEW (Nov)
  • Eurozone: GDP (Q3)

Wednesday

  • NAHB Housing Market Index (Nov)
  • Bullard (Hawk)

Thursday

  • Housing Starts and Building Permits (Oct)
  • Yellen (Dove)
  • Mexico: Central Bank Meeting (Rate hike expected)
  • China: Property Prices (Oct)

Friday

  • Leading Indicators (Oct)
  • George (Hawk)
  • ECB’s Draghio speaks in Frankfurt
  • APEC Leaders Summit in Peru

 

 

 

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Impact of a Trump Presidency

Donald Trump emerged as the winner last night of a hotly contested presidential campaign and will be inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States on Friday, January 20, 2017. The transition to a Republican presidency and Trump’s rejection of politics as usual, which drew so many voters, naturally lead to questions about his impact on the economy and markets. Today on our blog we provide a high level overview of our thoughts of the significance of a Trump presidency.

ECONOMY

Does Trump’s win change LPL’s view on the economy over the remainder of 2016 and into 2017?

The election results have not changed our long-term outlook for the U.S. economy. We will continue to monitor many important economic indicators, including the Five Forecasters, the Current Conditions Index, and the Recession Watch Dashboard, and will keep you updated in the event of any changes to our views.

Will the election results cause a recession?

Elections do not in and of themselves cause recessions. Policies can, however, and we need to wait to see which policies Trump moves forward with and the details of those policies.

Our Recession Watch Dashboard continues to point to an overall low risk of recession within the next year.

What impact might the election have on overseas economies and markets?

Trade has been a major theme in this election, yet a president’s ability to impact trade directly and immediately is somewhat limited. Trump has been outspoken in favor renegotiating NAFTA terms and has been opposed to the TransPacific Partnership (TPP), which has little chance of passing. The Trump victory raises some concern across foreign markets about U.S. trade.

FED

Will the election results impact Fed monetary policy later this year and in 2017?

We do not believe the election results have changed the Fed’s outlook. Furthermore, we believe the Fed is much less sensitive to financial markets than most people think. As it stands, we believe the Fed is on course to increase rates at its December meeting, with another 2-3 increases in 2017. It would take a major market disruption or a change in the economic fundamentals for the Fed to alter this course.

EQUITIES & FIXED INCOME

Will the election result cause a bear market in equities?

Just as an election does not cause a recession, it does not cause a bear (or bull) market. Government policies alone do not change the market’s long-term trend, although they are a factor.

Shorter term, elections are rarely a harbinger for a sell-off, and when they have been, the election has not been the primary cause. In election years since 1952, the S&P 500 has returned an average of 2.5% in November and December and has been higher 75% of the time. From Election Day until Inauguration Day, the S&P 500 has averaged a gain of 1.0% and has been higher 69% of the time. The median return jumps to 3.0% because of a nearly 20% drop in 2008 that skews the average return, but 2008 returns were fundamentally driven by the recession, not Obama’s election. The bottom line is some near-term volatility is likely, but a massive sell-off absent an economic recession has never happened in the period between the election and inauguration.

Are the near-term results impacted by the party of the President?

There doesn’t appear to be much of a difference in equity performance over the short term. Since the election in 1952, the final two months of the year have returned 2.6% when a Republican wins and 2.4% when a Democrat wins. Looking at the largest drops the final two months of an election year in 2000 (Republican victory) and 2008 (Democrat victory) stand out, as the S&P 500 dropped 7.6% and 6.8%, respectively. Both times the economy was either in a recession (2008) or about to fall into a recession (2000) – which greatly contributed to the equity weakness. With the end of the earnings recession, improving consumer confidence, and the best quarterly GDP print in two years – we presently have an improving economic backdrop, which should help contain any large downside moves in equities the rest of 2016.

Which sectors would likely benefit under Trump?

Biotech and Pharmaceuticals: Although Trump has stated his desire to repeal the ACA and has favored drug re-importation from other countries, controlling drug prices is unlikely to be as high of a priority for him as it would have been for Clinton. As a result, biotech and pharmaceutical companies may get a bump. We believe the market may have overreacted to perceived policy risk and we continue to favor the healthcare sector, which has historically performed well after elections.

Energy: Trump is likely to be positive for fossil fuels. He has promised less regulation on drilling, along with expansion of drilling areas. The segment of the industrials sector that services the energy sector may also benefit.

Financials: The Trump administration is likely to be easier on financial regulation than Clinton would have been. Trump has indicated he would like to roll back financial regulations, including the Dodd-Frank legislation enacted as a result of the financial crisis. Trump has also suggested bringing back Glass-Steagall, which would separate traditional banking from investment banking, a move we see as very unlikely.

How will the election impact the dollar and bonds?

Dollar: Trump’s policies are likely to be relatively negative for the U.S. dollar. His comments on renegotiating U.S. debt held by foreigners may limit the attractiveness of bonds to foreign investors.

Bonds: We saw an initial Treasury rally as stocks sold off overnight, but yields have since moved higher. We expect there may continue to be additional volatility as markets digest the news, but we broadly believe markets may be pricing in a rise in deficit spending, which is pushing yields higher; though continuation of low rates overseas is an offsetting factor, potentially keeping rates somewhat range bound over the near-term.

Will Trump’s policies lead to a debt downgrade?

Trump had mentioned last spring the possibility of renegotiating our debt and paying back less than the full amount if the economy were to falter. This idea, if implemented, would almost certainly lead to a debt downgrade. However, he backed away from this idea a few days after he floated it.

More realistically, Trump has signaled higher deficit spending. While deficit spending was a contributing factor to the U.S. debt downgrade by S&P in August of 2011, it wasn’t the only reason. The main driver of the downgrade was the debt ceiling crisis, as Republicans demanded a deficit reduction package before they were willing to join Democrats in raising the debt ceiling. Divided government and partisan politics led to months of debate and an eleventh hour deal that avoided a default. With Republicans keeping control of the Senate and the House, a fight over the debt ceiling fight that could threaten the U.S. credit rating is unlikely.

COMMODITIES

What is the election impact on gold?

Gold can thrive in chaotic environments and the uncertainty surrounding Trump’s policies could offer some support to the commodity.

What is election impact on oil?

When discussing oil, it is important to remember that oil stocks and crude oil can have very different performance, even though investors often expect similar returns.

Trump’s victory is likely a positive for oil stocks, especially in the short run. He has promised reduced regulations on oil and gas production, which would improve profitability of existing projects and may result in a very marginal increase in U.S. production. Note, this may be a negative for energy prices.

VOLATILITY

Will volatility increase due to the election outcome?

We expect that market volatility will likely increase. Equity markets have experienced abnormally low volatility recently, in part because of central bank intervention. As those interventions decrease, volatility should increase. However, we view that increase as a healthy aspect of equity markets. The degree to which the election results impact volatility will depend a great deal on which policies are actually enacted as a result of the changes in Washington.

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Investing in stock includes numerous specific risks including: the fluctuation of dividend, loss of principal and potential illiquidity of the investment in a falling market. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, geopolitical events, and regulatory developments. Because of its narrow focus, investing in a single sector, such as energy or manufacturing, will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. The S&P 500 Index is a capitalization-weighted index of 500 stocks designed to measure performance of the broad domestic economy through changes in the aggregate market value of 500 stocks representing all major industries. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: Monday, October 3, 2016

LPL Financial Research

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  • Global markets assess oil rally and Brexit update. U.S. stocks are lower this morning after closing the third quarter on a positive note. The financial and energy sectors led Friday’s rally, boosted by reports that Deutsche Bank may have reached a settlement to reduce the $14 billion fine levied by the U.S. Department of Justice and that OPEC may be on track to reduce output; WTI crude oil sits at $48.20/barrel. The British pound is falling against other currencies after U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May promised a swift exit from the European Union; U.K. stocks are markedly higher though the rest of Europe is near flat in afternoon trade. Overnight, the Nikkei Index gained 0.9% while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng rose 1.2% on mixed Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) data; the Shanghai Composite is closed all week for a holiday. Meanwhile, COMEX gold ($1316/oz.) is modestly lower and weakness in Treasuries

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China Leads Trend of Dwindling Foreign Interest in U.S. Stocks

China leads trend of dwindling foreign interest in U.S. stocks
Provided by MarketWatch

Last year, Chinese investors dumped nearly all the stocks that they had acquired over a span of seven years and are likely to remain cautious this year amid ongoing financial market volatility at home. But aggressive stock buybacks by U.S. companies flush with cash will likely offset the sting of waning Chinese appetite, according to Goldman Sachs.

China accounted for $96 billion in sales of U.S. stocks in 2015, wiping out almost all of the $97 billion purchased between 2008 and 2014, said David Kostin, chief U.S. strategist at Goldman Sachs, in a recent report. That is more than half of the $171 billion in U.S. equities sold by foreigners last year with much of the Chinese exodus occurring in the fourth quarter.

“Investors in China also sold $130 billion of U.S. debt securities in 2015, suggesting an overall reduction in U.S. investment from China rather than a rotation from U.S. equities to bonds,” he said.

The steady decline in oil prices accelerated U.S. stock sales with outflows from Canada and the Middle East hitting their highest levels since 2004.

Canadians sold $80 billion in U.S. stocks, contrasting with $3 billion in purchases in 2014. Investors from the Middle East sold $39 billion worth last year, nearly doubling the $20 billion in sales in 2014.

“Despite a low positive correlation between oil prices and flows from the Middle East, the drop in oil prices appears to have magnified U.S. equity outflows from both the Middle East and Canada,” said Kostin.

Brent crude oil , the international benchmark, fell 35% in 2015, according to FactSet data.

The outlook on foreign demand for U.S. stocks remains weak in 2016 on a combination of China’s economic uncertainties and a strong dollar .

“Since 1980, average annual purchases of U.S. equities by foreign investors during periods of a rising U.S. trade-weighted dollar equaled $37 billion compared with $82 billion when the dollar is falling,” he said.

Goldman Sachs forecast the trade-weighted dollar—which measures the currency against a select group of currencies most often used in international trade—to rise 8% over the next 12 months. More specifically, the bank predicted the greenback to rise 16% against the euro , 20% versus the Japanese yen  and 8% against the Chinese yuan .

Goldman Sachs estimates that international investors will divest a total of $50 billion worth of equities this year, the second year in a row that foreigners are net sellers.

Still, corporate buybacks are expected to more than make up for dwindling foreign interest with U.S. companies projected to repurchase $450 billion in shares this year. That is below 2015’s $561 billion but above the average of $360 billion buybacks between 2011 to 2015.

“With the U.S. economy expected to grow at a modest 2% pace and cash balances at high levels, firms are likely to continue to pursue buybacks as a means of generating shareholder value,” said the strategist.

J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. , Rockwell Automation Corp. , and Bank of America Corp.  have all announced sizable stock repurchase plans in the past couple of months with more companies likely to follow suit.

Among the most scrutinized will be Apple Inc.  which could release its capital allocation plan as early as Monday when it reports fiscal second-quarter earnings amid expectations that the company may boost its buyback program by $40 billion to $50 billion.

Goldman Sachs expects the S&P 500’s  earnings per share to rise 9% to $110 in 2016 from $100 in 2015.

Written by Sue Chang of MarketWatch

(Source: MarketWatch)

As Carly Simon Used to Sing, “We Can Never Know About the Days to Come…”

Medicare
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However, that doesn’t stop anyone from making educated guesses about the future of companies, financial markets, and economies. As we enter the second quarter, investment and business professionals have been offering their insights:

  • McKinsey & Company’s March Economic Conditions Snapshot indicated 80 percent of surveyed executives “…expect demand for their companies’ products and services will grow or stay the same in the coming months, and a majority believe (as they have in every survey since 2011) their companies’ profits will increase.” However, they are not as optimistic about the global economy as they were in December. About one-half of executives in developed and emerging markets said economic conditions globally are worse than they were six months ago.
  • The Wall Street Journal’s April 2016 Economic Forecasting Survey, which queries 60 economists, reported three-of-four survey participants expect a Fed rate hike in June. Few expect a recession during the next 12 months, putting the odds at 19 percent. Almost one-half stated global risks were the greatest threat to the U.S. economy, followed by financial conditions, a slowdown in consumer spending, falling corporate profits, and U.S. politics.
  • PIMCO’s Cyclical Outlook predicts China’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth may be in the 5.5 to 6.5 percent range. The target is 6.5 percent. In addition, a gradual devaluation of the yuan is possible, although China’s currency policy often produces unexpected twists and turns.
  • BlackRock Investment Institute’s second quarter outlook centered on three themes. First, returns are likely to remain muted in the future. Second, monetary policies appear to be less divergent, which could be a positive for some markets. Third, volatility may persist as the Federal Reserve normalizes monetary policy. Diversity and careful asset selection are likely to be critical in this environment.

While it’s interesting to read experts’ predictions and expectations for coming months and years, it’s important to remember forecasts are not always accurate. An organization that tracked forecasting results through 2012 found forecasts were correct about 47 percent of the time.

Weekly Market Commentary: April 11, 2016

© Lucy Nicholson/Reuters
© Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

We all learned a thing or two about Panama last week.

The country is not the home of the Panama hat, which is made in Ecuador. However, it is the only place in the world where you can watch the sun rise on the Pacific Ocean and set on the Atlantic Ocean.

It’s also home to a lot of offshore companies, according to the millions of records leaked from the world’s fourth largest offshore law firm. The Guardian reported 12 national leaders were among 143 politicians, athletes, and wealthy individuals (including family members and associates) who were participating in offshore tax havens.

It’s not illegal to hold money in an offshore company, unless the company facilitates tax evasion or money laundering, reported The New York Times. Further investigation will be required to know whether that was the case. CNBC suggested financial markets could be affected if the findings lead to greater regulation of foreign banks or prosecutorial action against them.

While the Panama scandal captured a lot of attention, it didn’t have much of an impact on markets. News that the U.S. Treasury was cracking down on corporate inversions, along with indications the U.S. Federal Reserve may raise rates twice during 2016, caused stocks to dip late in the week. Some major U.S. indices finished the week lower. (Corporate inversions are mergers that give U.S. companies a foreign address and lower their tax rates.)

We may be in for another round of market volatility. Corporate earnings season is here. That’s the period when publicly traded companies report how well they performed during the previous quarter. CNBC said, “Over the past 10 years, the emergence of first-quarter earnings reports has generally corresponded with a rise in volatility.”

Data as of 4/8/16 1-Week Y-T-D 1-Year 3-Year 5-Year 10-Year
Standard & Poor’s 500 (Domestic Stocks) -1.2% 0.2% -1.7% 9.4% 9.0% 4.7%
Dow Jones Global ex-U.S. 0.3 -2.5 -14.2 -1.5 -2.5 -0.7
10-year Treasury Note (Yield Only) 1.7 NA 1.9 1.7 3.6 5.0
Gold (per ounce) 2.1 16.7 2.7 -7.7 -3.4 7.6
Bloomberg Commodity Index 1.4 0.6 -20.4 -16.2 -14.6 -7.3
DJ Equity All REIT Total Return Index -0.4 5.7 4.3 8.7 11.9 7.0

S&P 500, Dow Jones Global ex-US, Gold, Bloomberg Commodity Index returns exclude reinvested dividends (gold does not pay a dividend) and the three-, five-, and 10-year returns are annualized; the DJ Equity All REIT Total Return Index does include reinvested dividends and the three-, five-, and 10-year returns are annualized; and the 10-year Treasury Note is simply the yield at the close of the day on each of the historical time periods.

Sources: Yahoo! Finance, Barron’s, djindexes.com, London Bullion Market Association.