Market Update: May 15, 2017

MarketUpdate_header

  • Overnight in Asia most indexes were up fractionally while Japan pulled back slightly. G-7 discussions focused on protectionist threats, which weighed on sentiment. North Korea also fired a new missile over the weekend, adding to tensions on the peninsula.
  • WTI crude oil prices are up ~3.0%, to $49.25/barrel, after energy ministers from Saudi Arabia and Russia agreed that extension to oil production cuts for an additional nine months, through March 2018, is needed.
  • European markets were mixed on either side of flat. Investors were positive on Christian Democrats state victory supporting Merkel’s hold on power, while oil move was also welcomed.
  • U.S. markets are moving higher, boosted by news on potential oil production cuts. Meanwhile, concerns over cyberattacks and Trump/Comey drama may dampen enthusiasm as trading progresses.

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Key Insights

  • The economy remains on track for Q2 gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 2.0% to 2.5% despite mixed inflation readings and retail sales below forecast.
  • The Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose +0.2% month over month and up from the drop of -0.3% in March, however both year over year CPI (+2.2%) and year over year core CPI (+1.9%) were below expectations, triggering the rally in safe havens last Friday.
  • Retail sales (+0.4%) were also below expectations, but up from the prior month. When considering the improvement in consumer sentiment, it is important to remember that this data point (retail sales) and the performance of retail stocks, should not be viewed as an indictment of the U.S. consumer. Rather than a changing consumer, it is a change in consumer buying habits, which is combining to alter not only retail sales figures, but also pricing measures. Consumers are spending: 1) more online, 2) on experiences over goods, and 3) comparison shopping using mobile technology. Consequently, it is very difficult for the department store model to continue charging premium, retail prices.
  • Considering the unemployment rate of 4.4%, wage growth of +2.5% year over year, riding confidence and delayed tax refunds, the near-term (Q2) and longer-term (2017) GDP trajectory appears favorable. Clarity on tax reform could take these numbers even higher.

Macro Notes

  • Excellent earnings season but bar will soon be raised. First quarter earnings season has been excellent by almost any measure. Results beat expectations by more than usual, the overall growth rate is very strong, and guidance has provided above-average support for analysts’ estimates for the balance of 2017. But at the risk of raining on the earnings parade, we would note that comparisons will get tougher as we anniversary the earnings recession trough of 2016, while the risk that the corporate tax reform timetable gets pushed into 2018 has increased. Market participants generally expect fiscal policy to begin to provide an earnings boost by year end, an expectation that has become increasingly tenuous.

 

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  • Chinese industrial production growth weaker than expected. Chinese industrial production growth came in at 6.5% vs. expectations of 7% and down from period month of 7.6%. On an absolute basis, the economy is still on track to meet its growth goals, though it looks like growth may have peaked for the year at the end of the first quarter. The government continues to crack down on excess leverage in the financial system; today’s numbers are unlikely to move them off that path.
  • Japan domestic demand, and prices, rise in April. We normally think of Japan as an export oriented economy, but domestic demand increased over 4% on a year-over-year basis, with the impact felt most strongly in demand for raw materials. Producer prices rose modestly last month against declining expectations and are running at 2.1% annually.
  • Bank of Japan. Just like the Federal Reserve (Fed) and the European Central Bank (ECB), the Bank of Japan (BOJ) is under some public pressure to outline how it intends to unwind both its zero-interest rate policy and the massive expansion of its balance sheet to 93% of the country’s GDP. Recent statements from BOJ Governor Kuroda suggests such policy announcements may be coming. The more good news that comes out of the Japanese economy, the more pressure the BOJ is under.
  • Win streak snapped, but lack of volatility remains. The S&P 500 snapped its 3-week win streak last week, with a modest 0.3% drop. One thing continued though and that was the incredibly small daily ranges and lack of overall volatility. On the week, the S&P 500 traded in less than a one-percent range (from high to low) for the second consecutive week ( only the third time since 1995). Additionally, the intraday range on Friday was 0.22% – the smallest daily range on a full day of trading in nearly three years.
  • Checking in on small caps. The lack of volatility isn’t just in the blue chips, as the Russell 2000 has traded in a range of only 6.8% over the past 20 weeks. That is the tightest 20-week range since at least 1990. After a big jump in the fourth-quarter, small caps have lagged large caps this year, as they continue to consolidate the late 2016 gains.

MonitoringWeek_header

Tuesday

  • Italy: GDP (Q1)
  • UK: CPI & PPI (Apr)
  • Eurozone: GDP (Q1)

Wednesday

  • Russia: GDP (Q1)
  • Japan: GDP (Q1)

Thursday

  • LEI (Apr)
  • ECB: Draghi

 

 

 

 

 

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: May 8, 2017

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  • Stocks in Asia were mostly higher with Nikkei & South Korea’s KOSPI surging +2.0% on positive vibes carrying over from U.S. jobs growth and Emmanuel Macron victory. South Korea’s election tomorrow looks to end a nine-year run for the ruling conservative party, which has been caught up in scandal. Hang Seng +0.4% while the Shanghai Composite slipped 0.8% to the lowest levels in more than six months amid Beijing’s efforts to rein in financial leverage.
  • European stocks are holding steady after opening down slightly and two strong weekly gains that essentially priced in the Macron victory. The broader Euro Stoxx 600 is up ~+9.0% YTD. The euro slipped -0.5% to 1.09, but note that the common currency has climbed in five of the past six days and has been trading near its highest levels of the past six months.
  • U.S. markets are slightly lower after the S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed Friday at record levels. The dollar is up +0.3% after four consecutive weekly declines. The 10-year yield is higher at 2.37%. Oil is holding on to $46/barrel and COMEX gold is up 0.3% after dropping more than 3% last week.

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French Elections

  • Macron victory essentially eliminates fears of worst-case scenarios: wave of populist victories threatening viability of currency and European Union (EU).
  • First election without either of two leading parties in Fifth Republic.
  • Still plenty of challenges–Macron must form alliances with Socialists, the party he left, to offset alt-right anger, potential lack of cooperation heading into parliamentary elections in June.
  • Euro-Stoxx 600 +2.0% last week and flat/down today.
  • Euro (~1.09) down 50 basis points today but stronger vs. dollar and other currencies past month.
  • Eurozone gross domestic product (GDP) and inflation both approaching +2.0% annual growth and this vote suggests trajectory can be maintained, accelerated with economic reforms in France.
  • European Central Bank (ECB) must remain accommodative near term, though, because Italy is the next challenge.

 Oil Prices

  • WTI fell -0.6% last week to $46/barrel as increased shale production in U.S. offsets Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) production cuts. To be sure, the announcement in November helped drive oil to ~$55, yet the increased profitability for higher cost producers in North America was evidently too good to pass up.
  • We expect OPEC to extend their production cuts at the next meeting in Vienna on May 25. Wall Street consensus is still bullish, projecting a range of $50-55/barrel over the next twelve months.
  • Recent sell-off largely technical in nature over supply concerns. WTI broke through 200-day moving average and failed to hold the new low for the year ($45) and a key Fibonacci retracement level. Frenzied trading in Asian markets ensued on Thursday, yet oil volatility was at its highest level in six months and relative strength (RSI) indicates oversold position.
  • “It’s different this time” – the U.S., not Saudi Arabia, is now the world’s swing producer and although OPEC has largely held on production cuts, U.S. rig counts are up.
  • We remain neutral on the energy sector as supply-demand adjustments still point toward a range of $50-$55 for WTI as OPEC cuts likely persist.

Earnings

  • Strong earnings season got even better last week. S&P 500 earnings for the first quarter rose more than 1% over the past week and are now tracking to a 14.7% year-over-year increase, compared with the 10.2% increase reflected in consensus estimates on April 1 (Thomson Reuters data). Both the earnings growth and beat rates (75%) are the best in more than five years. Excluding the rebounding energy sector, earnings are still on pace to grow a solid 10.5% year over year. About 40 S&P 500 companies will report results this week as earnings season winds down.

 

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  • Companies have delivered mostly upbeat guidance. Forward estimates inched fractionally higher last week and are down just 0.2% since earnings season began. Although the timetable for policy, particularly corporate tax reform, has been pushed out, we still see potential policy upside in 2018. The relatively bright outlook is helping support elevated valuations at an S&P 500 price-to-earnings ratio of 17.5 times.

Sell in May

  • Time to go away? The well-known “Sell in May and go away” period is upon us. Although this is one of the most widely known investment clichés out there, since 1950[1], historically the next six months are indeed the worst six months of the year for the S&P 500. So should you sell and wait to buy in November? We take a closer look at this cliché and show why it doesn’t always work and might not work this year.

Winning Streak

  • Up three weeks in a row. On Friday, the S&P 500 closed at its first all-time high since March 1 and in the process rose for the third consecutive week. It was also the first green Friday for the S&P 500 in nearly two months (March 10). This was the second three-week win streak of the year, with the earlier streak making it all the way to six weeks in a row (ending in early March). There hasn’t been a year with two separate six-week win streaks since 2013.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • Eurozone: Sentix Investor Confidence (May)
  • China: Foreign Direct Investment (Apr)
  • China: Trade Balance (Apr)

Tuesday

  • NFIB Small Business Optimism (Apr)
  • Germany: Industrial Production (Mar)
  • BOJ: Summary of Opinions at Apr 26-27 Meeting
  • China: New Loan Growth & Money Supply
  • China: Consumer Price Index (CPI) & Producer Price Index (PPI) (Apr)

Wednesday

  • Monthly Budget Statement (Apr)
  • ECB: Draghi Speaks

Thursday

  • Initial Jobless Claims (May 6)
  • PPI (Apr)
  • Eurozone: European Commission Economic Forecasts
  • UK: Bank of England Rate & Inflation Report
  • ECB: Publishes Economic Bulletin

Friday

  • CPI (Apr)
  • Retail Sales (Apr)
  • Germany: GDP (Q1 Prelim.)
  • Germany: CPI & PPI (Apr)
  • Eurozone: Industrial Production (Mar)

 

 

 

[1] Please note: The modern design of the S&P 500 stock index was first launched in 1957. Performance back to 1950 incorporates the performance of predecessor index, the S&P 90.  

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: April 10, 2017

MarketUpdate_header

  • Stocks move higher to start week. U.S. equities are modestly higher this morning as investors look ahead to the start of first quarter earnings season, with several tier one banks set to report later this week. This after major indexes shook off a lackluster jobs report and pushed higher through midday, only to give back gains late in the session; the S&P 500 fell 0.1%. The telecom (+0.2%) and healthcare (+0.2%) sectors clung to modest gains, while financials (-0.3%) and energy (-0.4%) stocks were among the days’ laggards. Overseas, investors are focusing on political turmoil stemming from Syrian incidents amid light economic data; Asian markets were mixed overnight, with the Nikkei (+0.7%) advancing, and the Shanghai Composite (-0.5%) moving lower; while European indexes are near flat amid range-bound trading. Elsewhere, WTI crude oil ($52.80/barrel) continues to climb on regional turmoil in the middle east, COMEX gold ($1250/oz.) is lower, and Treasury yields are down slightly to 2.37% on the 10-year.

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  • Over the last month, the LPL Financial Current Conditions Index (CCI) fell 20 points to 235. The CCI remains in the middle of the range it has held since 2010. Falling shipping traffic and an increase in initial jobless claims off of near 40-year lows were the main detractors from the CCI in the last month, while fed fund rate expectations and credit spreads were the main positive contributors.
  • Inflation and highlights from this week’s economic calendar. Despite Friday’s holiday, retail sales and the consumer price index (CPI) will be reported on that day (producer prices come Thursday) and will highlight what is otherwise a quiet week of data in the U.S. Two reports that deserve some attention, however, are National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Small Business Optimism and JOLTS (Job Openings and Labor Turnover) which will provide some insights into the policy-driven rise in business confidence and the job market, where Friday’s weak payroll employment report raised some concerns. Overseas, we get Chinese and Japanese trade data and G7 Finance Ministers will meet, while geopolitical risk will remain in focus following last week’s military strike in Syria.
  • S&P 500 poised for double-digit earnings gain. The S&P 500 is likely to produce double-digit year-over-year earnings growth for the first quarter (Thomson-tracked consensus is +10.1%) as earnings season gets underway this week. Earnings growth would reach 12-14%, the best since 2011, should companies beat estimates by the average 4.1% seen over the last five years according to FactSet. Last year’s first quarter marked the trough of the earnings recession, setting up an easy comparison, though we have several other reasons to be optimistic. Growth is expected to be powered by energy’s rebound from the oil downturn that battered the sector early last year while solid macro data in recent months is also supportive.
  • Fed balance sheet. Minutes from the recent Federal Reserve (Fed) meeting, released last Wednesday, signaled that the Fed intends to reduce its sizable $4.2 trillion balance sheet. We’ll analyze the options available to the Fed to accomplish a reduction of this size. In addition to how the balance sheet was built, we look at the structure of the assets within the portfolio for clues as to how the normalization may impact markets.
  • Continued strong breadth. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Composite Advance/Decline (A/D) line broke out to new highs last week. This is one of our favorite technical indicators, as it shows how many stocks are advancing versus declining at any given time. In other words, it measures overall market breadth. To see new highs occur suggests there is a good deal of investor participation and the overall equity rally could continue to have legs. Also, the NYSE A/D line broke out to new highs one year ago this week, well ahead of the eventual S&P 500 Index’s (SPX) new highs in July 2016.

MonitoringWeek_header

Tuesday

  • Eurozone: Industrial Production (Feb)

Wednesday

  • Bank of Canada Rate Decision & Monetary Policy Report

Thursday

  • Initial Jobless Claims (Apr 1)

Friday

  • Banks Open, Markets Closed
  • CPI (Mar)
  • Retail Sales (Mar)

 

 

 

 

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. 

Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

 

Market Update: February 21, 2017

© Susan Walsh/AP Photo

MarketUpdate_header

  • Stock advance continues following record-setting week. U.S. stocks are moving higher in early trading as markets reopen following the Presidents’ Day holiday. All three major averages ended the prior week at record highs; the S&P 500 (+0.2%) advanced modestly as telecom (+0.9%) was the best performing sector. Equities in Asia closed mostly higher overnight amid a quiet session, though the Hang Seng lost 0.8%. European markets are seeing broad strength in afternoon trading (STOXX Europe 600 +0.5%) as investors sift through PMI data that came in mostly above expectations; the U.K.’s FTSE is the exception (-0.1%) as disappointing earnings in the banking sector drag it lower. Finally, Treasuries are losing ground as the yield on the 10-year note is up to 2.44%, WTI crude oil ($54.78/barrel) is up 1.9%, and COMEX gold ($1234/oz.) is slipping 0.4%.

MacroView_header

  • Treasury prices initially lower, then rebound late week. Last week began with Chinese consumer price index (CPI) and producer price index (PPI) data rising much more than analyst estimates, setting the tone for more inflationary pressure on U.S. Treasuries. On Tuesday, Federal Reserve Chair Yellen, in her semi-annual testimony before Congress, stated that it would be “unwise to wait too long to hike interest rates.” This moved the yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury higher by 8 basis points (0.08%) to 2.52%, as investors began to price in a March rate hike. Thursday’s session saw a slight rebound in prices following a move lower in European yields as the Greek bond market stabilized. This week, investors will be watching the economic calendar for more evidence of inflation.
  • Inflation expectations edge up. The 10-year breakeven inflation rate finished last week slightly higher, moving from 2.01% to 2.02%. Importantly, the breakeven rate is above the Fed’s 2% inflation target. This week, we take a deeper look at Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) and why, despite solid performance relative to Treasuries in the second half of 2016, there may be further opportunity within the asset class for investors seeking credit and inflation protection.
  • Municipals supply lower on the week. Muni supply, as measured by the Bond Buyer 30-day visible supply data, remains below the 10-year average of approximately $11 billion, coming in at $7.5 billion last week. Supply is expected to remain light due to the holiday-shortened week. However, March and April supply is expected to grow as the Bloomberg fixed rate calendar supply data already shows an increase in supply from $6 billion on Thursday, February 16 to $7.6 billion today.
  • Investment-grade corporates spread breaches 1.2% level. As measured by the Bloomberg Barclays US Corporate Index, this level had provided resistance since late January. As equities made a decisive move higher over the last two weeks, investment-grade corporates have followed suit. Equity strength, investors’ demand for high-quality yield (above that of Treasuries), and increased prospects for corporate tax reform were all contributed to the spread contraction.
  • Earnings dipped last week but estimates still holding firm. Q4 2016 earnings for the S&P 500 are now tracking to a 7.5% year-over-year increase (as measured by Thomson), down about 1% over the past week on insurance industry declines. Financials and technology are still on course for solid double-digit earnings gains. While a 7.5% growth rate is certainly nothing to sneeze at, the better news may be that consensus 2017 estimates are down only 1.1% since earnings season began (and still up over 10% versus 2016), buoyed by flat or positive revisions to financials, energy and industrials estimates. Interestingly, these sectors are particularly policy sensitive, suggesting policy hopes are seeping into analyst and management team outlooks.

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  • Leading indicators rise. The Conference Board’s Leading Economic Index (LEI), an aggregate of indicators that tends to lead overall economic activity, rose a strong 0.6% month over month in January, beating the expected 0.4% increase and better than December’s also-strong 0.5% gain. The LEI is now up 2.5% year over year, a rate of change that historically has been accompanied by low risk of recession in the next year.
  • Domestic oil markets in focus. The addition to U.S. supply from shale deposits over the past decade is well known, but demand has changed as well, influenced heavily by our choice of vehicles as well as fuel efficiency standards. President Trump has signed a number of executive orders related to energy, most notably on the Keystone XL Pipeline. However, the administration has not weighed in on other issues, such as fuel economy standards. Any policy changes, as well as how they are enacted, could influence both U.S. supply and demand considerations.
  • European economic growth accelerates. A series of PMI data was released in Europe overnight, pointing to growth increasing at a faster rate than expected. Data from the two largest countries, France and Germany, were better than expected. The Eurozone composite reading (including services and manufacturing) registered 56, the highest reading in 70 months. Inflation in France remained contained at 1.3%, though many in Europe believe that the stronger economy will lead to higher inflation data in the near future.
  • More new highs. Equities staged a late-day rally on Friday to close at new record highs. In fact, the S&P 500 closed at its ninth record high for 2017. This is halfway to the 18 from 2016 and nearly to the 10 record highs made during 2015. Although no one knows how many more new highs will be made this year, it is important to note that they tend to happen in clusters potentially lasting decades. Going back to the Great Depression[1], there have been two long clusters of new highs – from 1954 to 1968 and from 1980 to 2000. The years in between were marked by secular bear markets and a lack of new highs. Could the current streak of new highs that started in 2013 last for many more years?
  • Four in a row. The S&P 500 gained 1.5% last week, closing higher for the fourth consecutive week for the first time since July 2016. The last time it made it to five weeks in a row was coming off of the February 2016 lows. Of the last 12 times the S&P 500 has been up four consecutive weeks, 10 of those times it has closed even higher two weeks later, so momentum can continue in the near term. The S&P 500 has been up only 3.5% in the current streak – the weakest four-week win streak in nearly five years. Going back to 1990, when the S&P 500 is up four weeks in a row, but with a total gain less than 4%, the average return the following two weeks is twice as strong (1.0% versus 0.5%) as the average return after all four-week win streaks.

MonitoringWeek_header

Tuesday

  • Markit Mfg. PMI (Feb)
  • Harker (Hawk)
  • Kashkari (Dove)
  • Eurozone: Markit PMI (Feb)
  • China: Property Prices (Jan)

 Wednesday

  • Existing Home Sales (Jan)
  • FOMC Minutes
  • Germany: Ifo (Feb)
  • OPEC Technical Meeting in Vienna
  • Brazil: Central Bank Meeting (Rate Cut Expected)

 Friday

  • New Home Sales (Jan)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Please note: The modern design of the S&P 500 stock index was first launched in 1957. Performance back to 1928 incorporates the performance of predecessor index, the S&P 90.

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: January 9, 2017

MarketUpdate_header

  • Stocks, oil tick lower to begin week. The S&P 500 and Dow are slightly lower in early trading along with WTI crude oil ($52.59/barrel), which is down more than 2.5% on concerns about increasing U.S. production. Stocks closed higher on Friday, led upward by the technology sector (+1.0%), while telecom (-2.7%) dropped sharply as Treasury yields rose. The session capped off a 1.7% gain for the S&P 500 in the first week of the new year; the Dow (+1.0% for the week) came within one point of the much-watched 20,000 mark. Overnight, Asian markets were little changed; Japan’s Nikkei was closed for a holiday while the Shanghai Composite moved up 0.5%. European indexes are mostly lower in the afternoon session; the STOXX Europe 600 is down 0.5%, though the U.K.’s FTSE 100 is up 0.2% as the pound hits a 10-week low against the dollar. Finally, recent buying interest in Treasuries continues to push the yield on the 10-year note down, currently trading at 2.37%, and COMEX gold ($1178/oz.) is climbing 0.4% despite a modestly stronger dollar.

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  • Week ahead. The consumer is in focus this week, with reports on December retail sales and consumer confidence as well as November consumer credit highlighting an otherwise quiet week for data, as is typical for the week after the monthly jobs report. A handful of Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) speakers are on tap this week after a year-end and early-year lull, including an appearance by Fed Chair Janet Yellen on Thursday at a town hall event in Washington, D.C. Overseas, China will release its December economic data this week, and central bank meetings in Brazil, South Korea, and Poland are on tap, with Brazil expected to cut rates. In addition, the Q4 2016 earnings reporting season unofficially begin, as firms begin to report sales and earnings for Q4 2016 and guidance on 2017.
  • Earnings season gets underway this week, and it looks like it will be another good one. This week, we preview fourth quarter earnings season, which may mark the return of earnings growth to the energy sector. Thomson-tracked consensus estimates for the quarter are calling for a 6.1% year-over-year increase in S&P 500 earnings. Based on typical upside, double-digit earnings growth may be within the realm of possibility. We have several reasons to be optimistic including resilient estimates, an improved pre-announcement ratio, good manufacturing data, and the energy rebound.
  • The biggest story of earnings season besides energy’s turnaround will likely be financials. The sector’s outlook and estimates have both improved in recent months as rising interest rates, stock market gains, higher oil prices, and narrowing credit spreads all help buoy the sector’s profit picture. Consensus estimates are calling for a market-leading 15.7% year-over-year increase, while more help could be on the way later this year in the form of deregulation.
  • A closer look at January. This week, we take a look at the many significant events that are set to take place during the first month of the year. The jobs report last Friday was initially viewed negatively, but after some time to think about it, the market decided the miss wasn’t so bad. Other big events this month include first quarter earnings, Chinese New Year, and the Federal Reserve meeting at the end of the month to decide interest rate policy.
  • The most bullish technical formation since 1982? The S&P 500 completed a very rare technical pattern last year for only the third time in history–a bullish outside year. This technical formation happens when the high of a year is greater than the high from the previous year and the low from the year is lower than the low from the previous year. Going back to 1928¹, this has only happened in 1935, 1982, and 2016. What does it mean? Well, in 1936 the S&P 500 was up 27.9%, and in 1983 the S&P 500 gained 17.3%–not to mention that a huge 18-year bull market kicked off.
  • Dow so close, yet so far. The Dow traded as high as 19,999.63 on Friday in its quest to finally hit the 20,000 mark. Eventually it sold off slightly and closed 0.2% away from this round number. Our stance remains the same; big round numbers don’t mean much to investors over the long run. If anything, now is a chance to take a step back, re-evaluate, and remember how far we’ve come during this bull market. But 20,000 by itself simply doesn’t mean anything to long-term investors.
  • New highs, but trouble brewing? The S&P 500 closed at a fresh all-time high on Friday for the first time since December 13. Also, the S&P 500 has now gone 60 consecutive days without a 1% drop, the longest such streak since 66 days in a row in the summer of 2014. Looking under the surface though, breadth was very weak as small and mid caps lagged. In fact, there were more NYSE decliners than advancers on Friday–even though the S&P 500 made a new high. Should this trend continue it could be a major worry, and it is something we will watch very closely.
  • Chinese reserves fall. As expected, official Chinese currency reserves declined to just over $3 trillion, down from $4 trillion at the high in the middle of 2014. China has been reducing its reserves, by selling U.S. treasury bonds and other securities to support its economy, and most importantly the yuan, against further depreciation. The yuan rallied at the end of last week, but resumed its decline as the markets opened Monday morning.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • Eurozone: Unemployment Rate
  • German Chancellor Merkel Speech on Future of Europe
  • China: CPI (Dec)
  • China: Money Supply and New Loan Growth

Tuesday

  • NFIB Small Business Optimism Index

Wednesday

  • Trump News Conference
  • Brazil: Central Bank Meeting (Rate Cut Expected)

Thursday

  • Initial Claims (1/7)
  • Yellen (Dove)
  • Harker (Hawk)
  • China: Imports and Exports (Dec)
  • Japan: Economy Watchers Survey (Dec)

Friday

  • Retail Sales (Dec)
  • Consumer Sentiment and Inflation Expectations (Jan)
  • Harker (Hawk)

Sunday

  • Japan: Machine Orders (Nov)
  • Japan: PPI (Dec)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

¹ Please note: The modern design of the S&P 500 stock index was first launched in 1957. Performance back to 1928 incorporates the performance of predecessor index, the S&P 90.

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

 

 

Market Update: December 19, 2016

MarketUpdate_header

  • Stocks edge up to begin quiet week. U.S. markets are slightly higher in early trading, kicking off what is likely to be a low-volume week on scattered data releases ahead of the holidays; though a speech by Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) Chair Janet Yellen this afternoon will garner attention. Friday’s session saw the S&P 500 (-0.2%) slip into negative territory for the week, as the heavily weighted technology (-0.8%) and financials (-0.9%) sectors lagged; rate-sensitive utilities and real estate both moved up more than 1%, despite only a 1 basis point (.01%) drop in the yield on the 10-year Treasury. Overnight, Asian markets were modestly lower, led down by the Hang Seng (-0.9%) after China stated it would take measures to control asset bubbles in 2017; major European indexes are near flat in afternoon trading, with the STOXX Europe 600 down 0.1%. Finally, WTI crude oil ($52.70/barrel) is slightly lower, COMEX gold ($1,141/oz.) is rising by 0.3%, and the yield on the 10-year note is down to 2.55%.

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  • 2016 calendar winding down. Although there are a few key events on tap this week (i.e., a speech by U.K. Prime Minister Teresa May on Brexit, the Bank of Japan’s final policy meeting of the year, and Vladimir Putin’s only press conference of 2016), the calendar is fairly quiet. Data on new and existing home sales, the service sector Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) and durable goods orders and shipments are the key U.S. data releases. Overseas, China’s property price indices (released over the weekend) and the German IFO reading for December (released overnight) were the only key events.
  • A look back. As the year comes to an end, we take a look back at some of our hits and misses of 2016. We certainly had some of both in a difficult year to forecast equity markets. First, the year got off to one of the worst starts ever as oil prices collapsed. Then it was the unexpected outcome to the Brexit vote, which stocks largely shrugged off, followed by Trump’s upset, which was followed by one of the strongest post-election stock market rallies in history-outcomes few predicted. Among the hits, our stock market forecast and our decision to largely stay on the sidelines with regard to international equity markets. Misses included favoring large caps and growth.
  • Can we count on Santa in 2016? Since 1950, the S&P 500 historically has been flat from December 1 through 15, then rallies nicely into year end. Last week, we took a look at this bullish time of year and the well-known Santa Claus Rally. But what happens during rare years like 2016, when the S&P 500 has already seen nice gains (2.9%) as of the mid-way point of the month? Going back to 1950¹, we found there were only seven other months that were up on December 15 at least 2.75%. The good news? The rest of the month the S&P 500 gained another 1.8% on average and was higher all seven times.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • Markit Services PMI (Dec)
  • Yellen (Dove)
  • Germany: Ifo (Dec)
  • UK: PM Teresa May Makes a Statement on Brexit

Tuesday

  • Japan: Bank of Japan Meeting (No Change Expected)

Wednesday

  • Existing Home Sales (Nov)

Thursday

  • Leading Indicators (Nov)
  • Durable Goods Orders and Shipments (Nov)
  • Russia: President Putin Holds His Annual Press Conference in Moscow

Friday

  • New Home Sales (Nov)

 

 

 

 

 

 

¹ The modern design of the S&P 500 stock index was first launched in 1957. Performance back to 1950 incorporates the performance of predecessor index, the S&P 90.

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: December 5, 2016

MarketUpdate_header

  • Global stocks shake off Italy vote; oil moves higher. U.S. indexes are moving higher in early trading, boosted by resilience in European equities after Italians voted down the country’s constitutional referendum on Sunday; rising WTI crude oil prices are also lending support. This comes after the S&P 500 failed to hold early gains in Friday’s session, as strength in defensive stocks was not enough to overcome weakness in the heavily weighted financials and consumer discretionary sectors. Overseas, Asian markets finished mostly lower; the Shanghai Composite (-1.2%) and the Hang Seng (-0.2%) both declined, whereas Japan’s Nikkei (-0.8%) took a breather after reaching 11-month highs last week. Stocks in Europe recovered from early selling pressure following Sunday’s vote in Italy; the STOXX 600 is up 0.4% mid-afternoon. Elsewhere, oil ($51.88/barrel) is tracking near 12-month highs on optimism around last week’s Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) deal, COMEX gold ($1163/oz.) is off 1.24%, and Treasuries are falling as the yield on the 10-year note trades at 2.44%.

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  • Quiet week ahead for data as investors mull election results in Europe. As is typically the case in the week after the release of the U.S. monthly jobs report, released last Friday, December 2, 2016, this week’s U.S. economic calendar is relatively quiet, with today’s key release being the service sector Institute for Supply Management (ISM) reading for November. After a flurry of Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) speakers today, December 5, the unofficial “quiet period” for the Fed begins, ahead of the December 13-14, 2016 Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting. Overseas, China will begin to report its November data set this week, and the central banks of Canada, Australia, and India all meet. With the Italian referendum and the Austrian election in the rear-view mirror, the key event in Europe this week is the European Central Bank‘s policy meeting on Thursday, December 8.
  • European equity markets, and the euro itself, are positive after yesterday’s voting. As widely expected, the Italian people voted against a referendum that would restructure how the country’s Senate would be elected, leading to the resignation of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi. His resignation opens the door for the anti-European Five Star party to gain political strength, and perhaps even lead the next Italian government. Although this is potentially destabilizing, the markets had well priced in the outcome of this vote. At the same time, Austrian voters rejected an anti-European candidate from the far right as their president. Though the presidency in Austria is relatively weak, the election of a far-right candidate would have been seen as another threat to European political integration and the euro itself. This positive surprise has helped the markets (outside of Italian stocks) remain buoyant.
  • Beige Book recap. The themes in the November 2016 Beige Book are consistent with our view that the Fed will raise rates later this month. At +64, the November Beige Book 2016 reading is now back in the middle of the range it has been in since early 2012. Despite the elevated level of uncertainty surrounding the U.S. presidential election and the outlook for the global economy, optimism on Main Street still reigns.
  • Irrational Exuberance Part 2? Twenty years ago today, Fed President Alan Greenspan gave his now famous Irrational Exuberance speech regarding over-valuations in the equity markets. Today, we examine if we are in another state of irrational exuberance. One concern is valuations are indeed higher than historical norms, although they are by no means near the euphoric levels of the late 1990s. On the fundamental front, the economy continues to show growth consistent with mid cycle, not late cycle. Last, overall market sentiment is showing many more bulls than we saw a month ago, but it still isn’t near the levels of excitement seen at previous market peaks.
  • Santa tends to come late. We all know that December is historically a strong month or equities, with the S&P 500 up 1.6% on average since 1950[1]. Here’s the catch: nearly all the gains tend to happen the second half of the month. Since 1950 on average, the S&P 500 has been flat as of December 15, rallying strongly during the second half of the month. The past 20 years, the S&P 500 has actually been down 0.4% as of mid month, before finishing 1.3% higher on average.

[1] Please note: The modern design of the S&P 500 stock index was first launched in 1957. Performance back to 1950 incorporates the performance of predecessor index, the S&P 90.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • ISM Non Mfg. (Nov)
  • Dudley (Dove)
  • Evans (Dove)
  • Bullard (Hawk)

Tuesday

  • FOMC Quiet Period Begins

Wednesday

  • India: Reserve Bank of India Meeting (No Change Expected)
  • China: Imports and Exports (Nov)

Thursday

  • Flow of Funds (Q3)
  • Eurozone: European Central Bank Meeting (No Change Expected)
  • China: CPI (Nov)
  • Japan: Economy Watchers Survey (Nov)

Friday

  • Consumer Sentiment and Inflation Expectations (Dec)

 

 

 

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Market Update: November 21, 2016

© Provided by CNBC

MarketUpdate_header

  • Stocks higher to begin holiday-shortened week. Equity markets are modestly positive this morning after gaining for the second week in a row; though the S&P 500, Dow, and Nasdaq each fell 0.2% on Friday. The healthcare sector (-1.1%) underperformed, led lower by biotech, while no other sector moved by more than 0.5%. Overseas, both the Nikkei and the Shanghai Composite advanced 0.8% overnight, while European markets are ticking higher in afternoon trading. Elsewhere, last week’s strength in crude oil ($47.65/barrel) has carried over as the commodity is up another 2.8% ahead of next week’s official OPEC meeting in Vienna, COMEX gold ($1214/oz.) is up 0.4%, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury is a couple of basis points lower after finishing the week at 2.34%, its highest close in over a year.

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  • Final earnings push to the finish line. With just a couple dozen S&P 500 companies left to report Q3 2016 results, Thomson-tracked earnings for the index are tracking to a 4.2% year-over-year gain, representing a 5% upside surprise. Excluding the energy sector’s earnings declines, earnings on pace for a solid 7.5% year-over-year gain. As impressive as the Q3 upside has been, the minimal 0.8% drop in estimates since October 1 for the next four quarters, including a small increase over the past week, has been particularly noteworthy and we think bodes well for the next two or three quarters.

earnings-dashboard-11-21-16

  • Another weekly gain for the S&P 500. The S&P 500 gained 0.8% for the week last week, but what is more worthwhile is it did this after gaining more than 3% the week before. Incredibly, this is now 10 consecutive times that the week after a 3% gain was green. Leading the way again were small caps and mid caps, as both the Russell 2000 and S&P 400 Midcap indexes closed at new all-time highs on Friday. The Russell 2000 is now up 11 consecutive days for the longest winning streak since 12 in a row back in 2003.
  • Holiday shopping preview. Although the market’s attention has been squarely on the election for the past several weeks, we should not forget how important this time of year is for the U.S. economy. Consumers are in good shape, with low financial obligations, steady job and wage gains, and high consumer sentiment measures. This, along with retailers’ back-to-school shopping increases and the solid stock market performance in 2016, suggest the National Retail Federation’s 3.6% forecast for year-over-year holiday sales growth may be doable. We do not necessarily expect these sales gains to translate into outperformance for the consumer sectors, but we do not expect them to spook markets.
  • Housing, manufacturing, and the consumer in focus this week as investors await the OPEC meeting. While a high-level OPEC meeting is set for Monday and Tuesday this week, the official OPEC meeting in Vienna isn’t until November 30. Until then, investors will digest Black Friday sales figures, which have become much less important in recent years, along with data on home sales, durable goods orders, and the Markit Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) for manufacturing. The Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) will release the minutes of its November 1-2, 2016 meeting this week as well. Other than the key German IFO data for November, it’s a fairly quiet week for international events and data, aside from a speech by European Central Bank (ECB)President Mario Draghi early in the week.
  • Welcome to Thanksgiving week. Historically the week of Thanksgiving has had a slight bullish bias, as do most trading days around major holidays. Over the past 20 years, the average return during the week of Thanksgiving for the S&P 500 has been 0.8%, positive 65% of the time (13 out of 20). Looking at the day-by-day performance, Monday has the best average return, up 0.5%, although Wednesday has been higher more often, 70% of the time. Surprisingly, the best Thanksgiving week over that timespan was 2008, when all four days were green and the S&P gained 12.0%. The worst? All four days in 2011 were red and the index fell 4.7%.

MonitoringWeek_header

Monday

  • OPEC Meeting in Vienna
  • ECB’s Draghi Speaks in Strasbourg

Tuesday

  • OPEC Meeting in Vienna

Wednesday

  • Durable Goods Orders and Shipments (Oct)
  • Markit Mfg. PMI (Nov)
  • FOMC Minutes
  • Eurozone: Markit Mfg. PMI (Nov)
  • Japan: Nikkei Mfg. PMI (Nov)

Thursday

  • Germany: Ifo

Friday

  • Advance Report on Goods Trade Balance (Oct)

 

 

 

 

Important Disclosures: Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. A money market investment is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although money markets have traditionally sought to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. Investing in foreign and emerging markets securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, political risk, and risk associated with varying accounting standards. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) are subject to interest rate risk and opportunity risk. If interest rates rise, the value of your bond on the secondary market will likely fall. In periods of no or low inflation, other investments, including other Treasury bonds, may perform better. Bank loans are loans issued by below investment-grade companies for short-term funding purposes with higher yield than short-term debt and involve risk. Because of its narrow focus, sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. Commodity-linked investments may be more volatile and less liquid than the underlying instruments or measures, and their value may be affected by the performance of the overall commodities baskets as well as weather, disease, and regulatory developments. Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. Investing in foreign and emerging markets debt securities involves special additional risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, currency risk, geopolitical and regulatory risk, and risk associated with varying settlement standards. High-yield/junk bonds are not investment-grade securities, involve substantial risks, and generally should be part of the diversified portfolio of sophisticated investors. Municipal bonds are subject to availability, price, and to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rate rise. Interest income may be subject to the alternative minimum tax. Federally tax-free but other state and local taxes may apply. Investing in real estate/REITs involves special risks such as potential illiquidity and may not be suitable for all investors. There is no assurance that the investment objectives of this program will be attained. Currency risk is a form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged. Technical Analysis is a methodology for evaluating securities based on statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices, volume and momentum, and is not intended to be used as the sole mechanism for trading decisions. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security’s intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends. Technical analysis carries inherent risk, chief amongst which is that past performance is not indicative of future results. Technical Analysis should be used in conjunction with Fundamental Analysis within the decision making process and shall include but not be limited to the following considerations: investment thesis, suitability, expected time horizon, and operational factors, such as trading costs are examples. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Chart of the Week: April 6, 2016

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The dust of a volatile quarter has cleared. The equity market exhibited a higher correlation to oil prices over the quarter than it has historically: oil price movements drove large cap stocks lower early in the year, to -10.3% YTD at the lowest point, and subsequently helped them rebound and finish the quarter up 1.3%. Price appreciation in oil and metals pushed the commodities index up 0.4%, and emerging market equities also moved higher, helped by stronger commodity prices, lower expectations for U.S. rate increases and a fall in the U.S. dollar. Further rate cuts in Europe and Japan did not boost developed market equities, which fell 2.9%. However, very low global interest rates, in combination with an extremely dovish Federal Reserve, caused spread compression and lower base rates over the quarter, leading to positive returns from U.S. fixed income. Finally, some investors dialed down equity risk in response to the U.S. recession scare, leading small cap stocks to fall 1.5%. While in our view the chance of recession over the next year is low, we continue to recommend a diversified portfolio of assets as the best way of weathering market volatility while achieving long-term investment goals.

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(Source: JPMorgan)

Oil Giants Draining Reserves at Faster Pace

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LONDON–The world’s biggest oil companies are draining their petroleum reserves faster than they are replacing them–a symptom of how a deep oil-price decline is reshaping the energy industry’s priorities.

In 2015, the seven biggest publicly traded Western energy companies, including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, replaced just 75% of the oil and natural gas they pumped, on average, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of company data. It was the biggest combined drop in inventory that companies have reported in at least a decade.

For Exxon, 2015 marked the first time in more than two decades it didn’t fully replace production with new reserves, according to the company. It reported replacing 67% of its 2015 output.

In the past, shrinking reserves could send investors and executives into a panic over a company’s future prospects.

These days, with ultralow oil prices, “it becomes less important” to replenish stockpiles, said Luca Bertelli, chief exploration officer at Italian oil producer Eni SpA. Eni has shifted spending away from high-risk, high-reward projects in favor of squeezing more out of fields that are already producing, he said.

That shift shows how producers are responding to low prices by pulling back on new exploration in favor of maximizing profits. The risk is that cutting back on new projects now, when prices are low, could lead to shortages and price spikes in the future.

Historically, energy companies spent heavily in the present to find resources for the future–new wells that would replace the barrels they pump every day. When they decide they can extract the oil and gas economically, firms book those resources as proved reserves, untapped inventories to be exploited at a profit down the road.

The current oil glut has forced companies to cut spending wherever they can. So they have pulled back on exploratory drilling and spending on new projects. Across the oil sector last year, companies approved just six new developments, according to Morgan Stanley researchers.

That is in contrast to the past decade, when high prices led energy firms to explore in far-flung regions. They spent billions of dollars on so-called megaprojects, in part to keep their inventories brimming for decades. And those investments helped to fuel today’s market glut.

Because of accounting rules, there is another drain on the “proved reserves” that companies book and report to investors: low oil prices. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission defines proved reserves as the volume of oil and natural gas that a company can expect to tap at a profit.

Some of the reserves companies added are too expensive to extract profitably at today’s prices. That has forced some companies to remove barrels from their books, and in some cases to write down the value of those assets.

Shell wrote off billions of dollars from the value of its assets last year, and low prices contributed to a decision to cancel a project in Canada’s high-cost oil sands. The company didn’t replace any of the oil it pumped last year. Overall its reserves shrank by 20%.

Despite lower reserves, big oil companies aren’t about to run out of crude. Exxon, for instance, retains enough reserves to last 16 years at the current rate of production. And in addition to their still-considerable proved reserves, the companies have access to other resources that could become viable to pump if oil prices rise.

Exxon Chief Executive Rex Tillerson told analysts earlier this month the company’s failure to fully replace the oil and gas it produced last year reflects its focus on “deploying capital efficiently to create that long-term shareholder value, even if it means interrupting a 21-year trend.”

SEC rules require oil companies to report “proved” reserves based on an average price each year. On a year-to-year basis, proved reserves can be volatile based on oil-price swings. Last year’s sharp price drop forced some companies to reduce their proved reserves, though falling costs helped offset the reductions. Some companies’ reserves also benefited from contracts that grant them a larger share of production when prices are low.

Among the largest oil companies, only Chevron Corp., Eni and France’s Total SA last year added more new barrels than they pumped. BP PLC replaced 61% of its production last year–excluding the impact of sales and acquisitions–and Norway’s Statoil ASA replaced 55%. While Shell’s reserves fell, the company this year completed a roughly $50 billion acquisition of BG Group PLC that is expected to boost reserves by around 25% from their levels at the end of 2014.

Companies’ reserve volumes are facing other potential threats beyond low oil prices. Some investors have expressed concern recently that legislation to curb global warming–such as taxing carbon emissions–could hasten a shift to cleaner energy and make fossil fuels more expensive to burn. That could make some oil reserves impossible to pump profitably. Oil companies counter that the world will need large volumes of oil and gas for decades.

In a sign of their focus on profitability over finding more oil, some investors have welcomed companies’ spending cuts despite the falling reserves.

“When the house is burning you’re not worrying if you need to paint the outside,” said Christopher Wheaton, a fund manager at Allianz Global Investors, which holds stock in several of the large oil companies including Shell, Total and BP. “It’s crisis management at the moment.”

That attitude marks a shift from the early 2000s, when companies responded to investor pressure to grow with aggressive drilling and, in some cases, aggressive accounting. Shell in 2004 admitted to overstating its reserves by more than 20%. Its share price dropped, senior executives left, and the company paid hefty fines. Shell declined to comment.

In the years after the Shell scandal, companies raced to find more crude and poured tens of billions of dollars into projects to increase production–helping fuel the current glut and prompting Shell to shift its strategy. In 2014 Shell stopped using growth in oil and gas production as a performance metric for executive bonuses, instead emphasizing return on capital.

Written by Sarah Kent of MarketWatch

(Source: MarketWatch)