Here’s Why Tony Robbins Tells Millennials to Buy a House, Not a Home

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For generations past, home ownership was a significant rite of passage that signaled stability, commitment, and, often, prosperity.

But, in this as in so many other cases, millennials are different.

As of 2015, adults under age 35 made up 19 percent of U.S. households but less than 10 percent of homeowners, according to a report released by Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. In fact, in 2015 home ownership for that group fell to a historic low of 31 percent.

Entrepreneur and bestselling author Tony Robbins says that, while millennials might be missing out on the social upsides of home ownership, real estate is not the best investment they could be making

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“One of the weakest performers [is] your own personal real estate, because it doesn’t provide much income,” Robbins says. “It’s an inflation hedge. You do a little better than inflation, and you can have your own home, so there’s a psychological, emotional benefit.”

Instead, millennials in a position to buy property should be considering how to do so in a way that will provide them additional cash flow, he says.

“If you can own real estate, real estate with an income is the one [form of] real estate that’s more valuable,” says Robbins.

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Opinions on the imperative of millennial home ownership vary.

Self-made millionaire Grant Cardone tells CNBC that home owners are forced to continue to spend unceasingly, and that he regrets buying a house at age 30.

“Unless you have 20 million bucks in the bank, in cash, you have no business buying a house,” says Cardone.

In personal finance classic “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” author Robert Kiyosaki notes that houses should be viewed as a liability, as opposed to an asset, and points out that it’s not a given that a home will appreciate in value.

“I am not saying don’t buy a house. What I am saying is that you should understand the difference between an asset and a liability,” Kiyosaki writes. “When I want a bigger house, I first buy assets that will generate the cash flow to pay for the house.”

Robbins emphasizes that real estate investing doesn’t need to entail keys and a welcome mat.

“You can [invest] through a REIT. You don’t have to buy everything, you get a piece of all these things,” Robbins says.

But whether millennials choose to spend their nest egg on a nest, or begin focusing on a portfolio instead, Robbins says the worst mistake is making no investment at all: “The most important thing, I think, for millennials, is to get in the game.”

 

 

Written By: Kathryn Dill
Source: CNBC

 

Is This 100-year Old Indicator Suggesting Market Strength?

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (Dow) gained for the sixth consecutive day yesterday and closed at a new all-time high for the third straight day. The Dow Jones Transports (Transports), meanwhile, had another big day yesterday and has been one of the top performers since the election. The Dow and Transports will forever be linked, as they are the two components to Dow Theory. Charles Dow created the Dow Theory in the late 1800’s, and it revolves around needing confirmation from both industrial and transports before establishing market direction. Think about it—if both the industrial and transports are strong, this likely suggests an improving economy. The flip side is if both are going lower, the economy is weakening.

Another way to look at the relationship between the two indexes is to compare them on a relative strength chart. When the ratio of the Transportation Index to the Dow increases, this means that transports are outperforming. We have found that when this ratio on a weekly chart moves above its 40-week simple moving average for more than three weeks, stocks tend to move higher over the next year. This signal triggered recently; the last time it happened was in late 2012, right before a huge equity rally in 2013.

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Looking at historical data going back to 1979, this signal triggered 20 times. Take note, we removed the two largest recessions over the past 20 years, as we don’t see any signs of a coming recession. The S&P 500 gained more than 9% on average six months later and was higher 80% of the time. Going out a full year, the S&P 500 has been up more than 16% on average and higher all 20 times.

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Could this newfound strength from the transports be telling us the economy could be set for strong improvement as we head into 2017? It very well could be, and this could be another reason to expect the equity bull market could possibly continue as well.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. All indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Unmanaged index returns do not reflect fees, expenses, or sales charges. Index performance is not indicative of the performance of any investment.The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide or be construed as providing specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual security. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principal. Because of its narrow focus, specialty sector investing will be subject to greater volatility than investing more broadly across many sectors and companies. The S&P 500 Index is a capitalization-weighted index of 500 stocks designed to measure performance of the broad domestic economy through changes in the aggregate market value of 500 stocks representing all major industries. The Dow Jones Industrial Average Index is comprised of U.S.-listed stocks of companies that produce other (non-transportation and nonutility) goods and services. The Dow Jones Industrial Averages are maintained by editors of The Wall Street Journal. While the stock selection process is somewhat subjective, a stock typically is added only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth, is of interest to a large number of investors, and accurately represents the market sectors covered by the average. The Dow Jones averages are unique in that they are price weighted; therefore, their component weightings are affected only by changes in the stocks’ prices. This research material has been prepared by LPL Financial LLC.

Facebook Close Sets Speed Record for $250 Billion Market Cap

David Paul Morris/Bloomberg
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

It seems like just yesterday that Facebook Inc. went public. Now its market value has topped $250 billion.

The social network company’s 2.4 percent climb to a record close on Monday made it the first company in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index to breach that market cap so quickly. The previous record holder was Google Inc., which took about eight years.

Facebook’s rapid ascent may indicate investor confidence that the company will continue to increase mobile-advertising sales on its application and others. To some degree, the gain also reflects froth in tech stocks; the Nasdaq Internet Index has almost doubled since Facebook went public.

Its shares trade at 87 times earnings, almost five times the average in the S&P 500. Companies in the Nasdaq Internet Index trade at a price-earnings ratio of 27.

“When you see stocks with these high multiples, it shows you the market’s comfort in the longer-term growth story,” said Paul Sweeney, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. “Investors think Facebook is more valuable than the average Nasdaq stock.”

Troubled IPO

The company’s quick rise to $90.10 a share on Monday is even more remarkable because the stock lost more than half its value in the four months after its IPO in May 2012. Facebook had a market value of $104.2 billion at its IPO, so the company didn’t have to climb as far as some other companies did to reach $250 billion.

With a market value of $253 billion, Facebook is now the ninth-biggest company in the S&P 500 — bigger than Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Procter & Gamble Co., which took decades to grow as valuable.

Facebook’s revenue from advertising — from which the company gets more than 90 percent of its sales — increased 46 percent to $3.32 billion in the first quarter from a year earlier. More than two-thirds of that came from mobile ad sales. Analysts estimate that sales rose 37 in the second quarter, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Longer-term, the company plans to serve ads on other applications and websites and to make money from its rapidly growing Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger apps. Facebook also is betting on its $2 billion purchase last year of Oculus VR Inc., a virtual-reality headset maker, and efforts to expand Internet connections in developing countries.

Written by Michelle Davis of Bloomberg

(Source: Bloomberg)