Women Still Shorted on Wages and Good Jobs

If you’re a woman, maybe now is a good time to consider getting into data entry keying.

That’s one of the precious few jobs in which women can expect to earn a median wage about $50 a week more than their male counterparts.

Of course, it’s not a great job. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a data entry keyer operates a keyboard to enter data, and she (it’s “she” 75 percent of the time) earns a little less $30,000 a year.

Tuesday is International Women’s Day, a good time to review the data on how women fare in the U.S. labor market. Last year, the average full-time female employee made a median of $726 a week. That’s 81 cents for every dollar made by the median man, and it’s actually a bigger gap than the 83 cents per dollar the median woman made in 2014.

In the U.S., certain jobs (like data entry keying) are far more likely to be held by women than men (and vice versa). Here’s how our labor market breaks down by gender, with blue indicating occupations that have a higher percentage of women workers than five years ago:

Women make up about 95 percent of all child care workers, earning a median wage of $475 a week (for personal care and service occupations). Men, on the other hand, still make up more than 80 percent of aerospace engineers, chemical engineers and software developers, who make about four times as much.

In the last five years, those gender lines haven’t shifted much at all. Women are now less likely to be models and religious directors (red dots) and slightly more likely (blue dots) to be tailors, clerks and financial analysts.

Men also tend to make more within occupational categories. That’s true for nearly every profession with weekly wage data available, except for retail and wholesale buyers, data entry keyers and accounting clerks. As you can see, the gap between men and women is wider the higher up the pay scale you go.

Written by Mark Fahey of CNBC

(Source: CNBC)

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